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Tree laws in Ireland-- Legal requirements for tree felling.


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medieval knievel
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Joined: 03 Sep 2007
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2012 8:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the issue would be taking down large trees which overhang a road. i suspect a road closure would be inevitable.
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2012 11:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
the issue would be taking down large trees which overhang a road. i suspect a road closure would be inevitable.


That would be a matter to be taken up with you county or urban council, totally exclusive to the Felling Notice issue medieval knievel.

On the felling issue if this conifer is less than 100 feet from the dwelling or temporary structure then you should be good to go on that side.
Quote:

Notice of intention to fell or uproot trees must be given in writing on a form known as a Felling Notice which may be obtained from any Garda Station or directly from the Felling Section of the Forest Service. On receipt of a completed Felling Notice, an Order prohibiting the felling of the trees is issued. This protects the trees in question while consideration is given to the issuing of a felling licence.

The prohibition on the uprooting or cutting down of trees does not apply where:

Arrow it is less than 100 feet from a dwelling other than a wall or temporary structure;

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tippben
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 06, 2012 10:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If they are adjacent to a road, and that close to your house, the only safe way to do it is to climb the tree, and take it down in sections, rigging the branches to ensure that they drop in the right place. It's a job for a professional aboriculturalist crew, who will sort out any road safety problems for you. Please don't attempt it yourself.
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 08, 2012 9:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

don't worry - i would not even begin to try!
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Pad
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 15, 2012 11:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

James Kilkelly, was GPI. wrote:
Quote:
the issue would be taking down large trees which overhang a road. i suspect a road closure would be inevitable.


That would be a matter to be taken up with you county or urban council, totally exclusive to the Felling Notice issue medieval knievel.

On the felling issue if this conifer is less than 100 feet from the dwelling or temporary structure then you should be good to go on that side.
Quote:


The prohibition on the uprooting or cutting down of trees does not apply where:

Arrow it is less than 100 feet from a dwelling other than a wall or temporary structure;


Hi James,

This is a great forum and I'm so glad to find such a mass useful gardening information, I have however almost been pulling my hair our trying to make sense of this tree felling legislation, I'm just quoting what you said above because it doesn't exactly match what the agriculture.gov.ie states which is:
"The requirement for a felling licence for the uprooting or cutting down of trees does not apply where:"
i understand you might have changed it to be a bit more readable for the likes of meself but what confuses me about their terming is(and this may be a stupid question) but does that mean a notice still has to be filled out and submitted 21 days prior to doing any work?

source:
http://www.agriculture.gov.ie/forestservice/treefelling/legalrequirementsfortreefelling/

also on the agriculture.gov.ie site they say:
Quote:

Felling Landowners are required under the Forestry Act, 1946, to give notice of intention to fell trees, following which prohibition orders are normally served. These remain in force pending the issue of a Limited Felling License, which can include environmental and replanting conditions


what legislation covers the likes of storm blown trees or trees that are a danger to falling onto a road/property, do these require licenses/notices submitted too?
they can hardly expect us to travel into a gardai station and then wait around a few days or weeks for a license to be issued in cases like these.

source:
http://www.agriculture.gov.ie/forestservice/treefelling/treefelling/

another interesting point i'd like to clear up is what exactly is considered to be cutting a tree down? apart from the obvious like uprooting or cutting it right down to the stump, cutting it lower than 2 meters? 1.5 meters?

this has been a very grey area for me from the conflicting suggestions i've found online and i'd love to understand the correct way to go about felling, pruning and topping etc.
my mother in law has dozens of over grown trees in her back garden and apparently she got one cut down last year and she was fined after the next door neighbour reported her to the council! Laughing
she's looking to get the rest topped/pruned and some felled but a lot of them don't fall under the exemptions for a license(100ft from a property, fruit tree etc) and it looks like it will be meself and the rest of the inlaws carrying out the work with hopefully some supervision since she's taken ill a few months back

thanks in advance, i say a lot of other researching this topic online will also be glad to have this grey area lifted! Wink
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 19, 2015 12:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

is there any way to compel a neighbour to deal with a tree planted too close to a house? a colleague was asking me, he's not sure what type of tree it is, but he reckons it's too close to the house in terms of both light issues and potential root run damage.
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