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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland

Planning a Vegetable Garden? How to Make a Vegetable Garden.


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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Fri May 16, 2008 12:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yorky wrote:
I have left nearly three feet, as per the instructions on the packet. I'll get some posts and nettting for support- should I put it between the drills which would mean the netting is about 15 inches away from each drill?


The netting runs along the drill directly above the seedlings, so that the peas start climbing as soon as possible.

Yorky wrote:
Another issue I had today is with calabrese and tomato seedlings. I sowed the seeds in a seed tray with a lid and the seedlings are ready to plant out into pots. I had the seed tray on an indoor windowcill and today I put it in the greenhouse with the lid off and the greenhouse door open for about an hour while I was busy elsewhere. The leaves seem like they have withered for some unknown reason - does anyone know why so and will they recover?


Sounds like they got a cold breeze or two from the greenhouse door being open.
They required hardening off, a gradual acclimatization to toughen plants by giving lengthening periods of exposure to colder conditions.
Will they come back with new leaves only time will tell, keep them watered.
You can post up a picture of the seedlings and I may be able to fill in the blanks.

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Yorky
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PostPosted: Fri May 16, 2008 6:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for your reply, here are some photos:

http://i238.photobucket.com/albums/ff250/Kilnadrain/P1030199.jpg
http://i238.photobucket.com/albums/ff250/Kilnadrain/P1030202.jpg
http://i238.photobucket.com/albums/ff250/Kilnadrain/P1030204.jpg
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Sat May 17, 2008 12:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yep, looks like shock alright, maybe from greenhouse intense sunlight, but more than likely from a cold breeze..
Not so bad in the first picture, a bit worse in the other two.
Keep them watered indoors for a few days.

A bit of an explanation on hardening off seedlings......
If seedlings are grown outside and exposed to the weather, they won't need hardening off.
But if they've been grown indoors, they more often than not need a bit of toughening up to prepare them for planting out.
They need to be brought outdoors for a longer time each day into a spot sheltered from cold winds and harsh sun.
Avoid early morning sun for the first few days
It is important to bring them indoors at night for the first few days for sure.
Usually at the the end of a week or so, they'll be tough enough to transfer to their permanent planting location.
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Roadrunner5
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 20, 2009 2:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,

I'm putting down raised vegetable beds in the backgarden but as it's a small garden, I'm looking for wood that a bit decorative like in the pic you have up beside the section on "vegetable garden size".

Would you know any good suppliers in the Dublin/Meath area ?

Thanks
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newgardener09
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2009 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi all,

Im very new to gardening,but am keen to learn. I want to start growing my own fruit and veg,and have been reading lots on it. I just have a quick question about the raised beds and crop rotation. Ive decided Im going to plant in raised beds. How many do I need? Judging by the info on crop rotation Id need 5 raised beds yes?

Also,the vegetables are broken inot 5 groups for the crop rotation, do you plant different vegetables in each raised bed,or the same? EG-the raised bed for potatoes,do you also plant the other veg from the potato family in the same raised bed?

Sorry for so many questions,I just want to be armed with all the knowledge before I start! This is something Ive wanted to do for such a long time,and Im so happy that Im now in a position to do it.

thanks in advance
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2009 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi newgardener09,
I don't know about others, but most people I think use 4 beds on average. I use 5. The 5th is heavily manured and left fallow for a season, my choice, the other 4 are grown in.
All your cabbage family in one bed, root crops in another, potatoes in another then peas/beans etc.
The next year move them all round a bed, in my case using the 5th within the rotation so another bed gets a rest. The fallow bed I use for my root crops. Things like lettuce and other quick crops can be sown in ground that is being emptied of it's crop, for example, once you start lifting potatoes, use the empty ground as you lift to grow some lettuce. I plant out my leeks in empty potato rows. Others will have different ideas but crop rotation is important. At the end of the day it's down to land availability as to how many plots you have.
Bill.

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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2009 3:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Liparis said most of it already, but just to hone a few points myself...........

newgardener09 wrote:
Ive decided Im going to plant in raised beds. How many do I need? Judging by the info on crop rotation Id need 5 raised beds yes?


Not necessarily , it depends on whether you are growing all groups of veg and how much veg overall.
Say for instance some people can't abide the taste of veg from the brassicas, which contains cabbage, cauliflower, brussel sprouts, broccoli, radish, swedes and turnips. So they may be omitting a bed dedicated to brassicas.
Or drastically reducing the amount of brassicas grown which will leave room in the bed for something from another group.
This combining of two different groups of veg at either ends of beds is often done, and it can benifit you as companion planting.
A good example of example of companion planting........ the strong scent of leeks and onions protecting carrots from the carrot fly.
They all don't have to be in totally different "boxes" year after year.
But whatever you do, avoid planting the same vegetable in the same soil year-in,year-out.

Also remember 5 raised beds (3 to 4ft wide and approx 9 to 12ft long) may seem like enough, but what if you really like carrots, or onions, you may need more than 5 raised beds to satisfy your appetite.

newgardener09 wrote:

Also,the vegetables are broken inot 5 groups for the crop rotation, do you plant different vegetables in each raised bed,or the same? EG-the raised bed for potatoes,do you also plant the other veg from the potato family in the same raised bed?


You can, or you can "side by side" companion plant if you like.

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newgardener09
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2009 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Liparis and GPI thank you so much for the replies,much appreciated. I would probably need the 5 raised beds so id imagine, as i eat lot of veg,and would like veg from all 5 groups. Where can I buy raised beds, and what price range are they?

Now on to fruit-does fruit need to be grown separately to veg ?
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BillyBoy
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 27, 2010 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

James / Liparis, thanks for all the information here! I've just started planting some seeds in my greenhouse so I'm looking forward to being able to pick your brains!

Cheers, Bill
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2011 12:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

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sgmgarden
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 09, 2013 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Although this is an older post, it's a really good guide. Vegetable gardening appears to be becoming more and more popular these days and it's important that people know where to start in order to do it right.
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ROXANNE
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 07, 2017 9:10 pm    Post subject: Re: Planning a Vegetable Garden? How to Make a Vegetable Gar Reply with quote

Hi i know this reply is a little late "but ive only just joined the forum,
but feel i should add a little point that may really help those who are about to start growing And its this when you think of todays prices of any fruit/veg you'll soon understand not only that you can save on the cost short time
but the likes of fruit tree's / bushes are long long time savers,
Let me explain in a little more detail,
if you purchased a fruit tree "lets say an apple, it'll cost you under 30euro, it'll produce fruit within a few year and (7 years for a full crop) and after this you've fruit for many years to come and at the price you first purchased the tree,

Now bushes are cheaper (currants etc) and again these crop from year one and you can take cuttings and increase your crop of bushes "again producing more and more currants to both make jams puddings etc etc year in year out all for the first outlay cost of the first bush,
You dont need a garden to grow a lot of fruit bushes or even potatoes all these can be grown in containers on patios etc,

I'll guarantee the cost of fruit will continue to go up "but" yours wont
And by growing your own fruit/veg you'll know what your eating and how it was produced "no nasty chemicles added and last of all you'll never buy fresher fruit/veg etc than that of the veg etc you harvested minutes before its ready to cook or wash and eat full of all the goodness fresh food should have.

So if your thinking of taking up gardening and you need a reason why!!!!!!

Im sure the above reasons should give you a few reasons why you should Wink Laughing

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